What is in the PAS Database Part IV: Aoristic Analysis

Temporal uncertainty inherent in the Portable Antiquities Scheme database (PASd) poses challenges to representing and analysing the finds data. One powerful and straightforward technique for understanding the temporal distribution of the PAS finds is aoristic analysis. This technique has been used for example by criminologists for estimating peak offence times (e.g. variability in the frequency … More What is in the PAS Database Part IV: Aoristic Analysis

What is in the PAS Database Part III: Temporal Uncertainty and Trends in PAS Dating

This post will examine the contents of the Portable Antiquities Scheme database (PASd) from the perspective of temporal information relating to the finds records. The key fields containing finds record dating information in the PASd are: broadperiod            Indicating the board historical period of the find, as defined by the Controlled Vocabulary section of the PAS website. … More What is in the PAS Database Part III: Temporal Uncertainty and Trends in PAS Dating

What is in the PAS Database Part II: Spatial Data and Fuzziness

Records in the PAS database contain general geographic data in the form of the finds’ European region, county (or Local Authority Area), district and parish name, and geographic coordinate data given as the UK Ordnance Survey (OS) grid reference, easting/northing (derived from the former) and longitude/latitude. Access to the coordinate information is restricted to OS … More What is in the PAS Database Part II: Spatial Data and Fuzziness

What is in the PAS Database Part I: Object Types

This series of blog posts is intended to give readers an overview of the contents, structure, strengths and biases of the Portable Antiquities Scheme database (PASd) of archaeological small finds. Further guides and advice can be found on the PAS website. Building on these, later posts will examine the PAS medieval finds records with particular … More What is in the PAS Database Part I: Object Types

Understanding Medieval Economy through the Portable Antiquities Scheme Data

Weekly markets and annual fairs were integral components of medieval economic life. In England and Wales over 5,000 such individual events have been recorded by the sixteenth century in written sources, demonstrating extraordinary economic vitality that encompassed not only the urban inhabitants of towns but spread deep into the rural countryside. Recent scholarship has rightly … More Understanding Medieval Economy through the Portable Antiquities Scheme Data

WELCOME

This website is dedicated to at British Museum research project to investigate travel, trade and urbanisation in medieval England, using Portable Antiquities Scheme data (finds.org.uk). You can search this site to learn more about this project, its aims and objectives, how it is funded and the researchers involved.